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Video answers: Flying Private Jets

Here are the answers to last Friday’s video, enjoy!

Suggested ICAO level for video: 5+

  1. What’s strange about it is that you could fly first class on the route many times before the cost would come close to the cost of a single flight on a private jet.
  2. It makes sense for Walmart because the city where they’re based doesn’t have enough commercial flights to allow regional vice presidents to visit multiple store and return in a single day.
  3. Flying international would make sense for a company when a number of executives need to fly and a number of connections have to be made to reach the destination. In this case renting a large private jet could save the company time and money.
  4. Private jets are terrible for the environment and in addition, executives are using them more and more for personal, leisure trips instead of exclusively for business trips.

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Video Answers: Air Traffic Control

Here are the answers to last Friday’s video, enjoy!

Suggested ICAO level for video: 5+

  1. Eurocontrol provides air traffic management services to 43 air navigation service providers, more than 500 airports and more than 1,000 airlines over the network.
  2. If a flight plan is rejected, it’s handed over to people who resolve the problem in coordination with the airline.
  3. Before an aircraft gets to a runway, ground control is responsible for it.
  4. It monitors upper airspace above 24,500ft over Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and north-west Germany.
  5. They have to maintain a minimum of 1,000ft of vertical separation and 5nm of horizontal separation.
  6. The controller has influence over the speed, altitude and direction of each flight.
  7. If there is an air traffic control delay, airlines can wait or they can choose an alternative route that would be more costly.

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Video answers: Building the 737MAX

Here are the answers to last Friday’s video, enjoy!

Suggested ICAO level for video: 5+

  1. It has paper checklists, a seven-step startup process, a warning light, physical cables to link fight controls to flight surfaces, all of which made it different to other modern aircraft.
  2. The original plan was to replace the 737 with an all-new aircraft.
  3. Fuel efficiency was less important for short-haul flight because these planes traditionally spent less time in the air per day than long-haul aircraft.
  4. Airlines are starting to use narrowbody aircraft for longer and longer flights.
  5. The American Airlines order for an ‘updated’ 737 convinced Boeing to modify the 737NG instead of building a totally new airplane.
  6. It would want a less modern, less efficient plane because they’re cheaper to buy and don’t require expensive training sessions to get their pilots type rated.
  7. Boeing had to move the engine higher and further forward on the wing to be able to fit it with the new, more efficient engine.
  8. MCAS was necessary because the new engine position and increased height of the landing gear created a tendency for the plane to pitch up more than the previous generation.
  9. It was likely caused by a malfunctioning MCAS sensor which kept pushing the plane’s nose down.

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Video answers: Running out of pilots

Here are the answers to last Friday’s video, enjoy!

Suggested ICAO level for video: 5+

  1. A person needs a university qualification, a private pilot’s licence, a commercial pilot’s licence, 265 flight hours, an ATPL licence and then around an extra 1500 flight hours.
  2. To accumulate these hours pilots work as flight instructors, fly skydiving planes, tow banners or work for airlines flying small single-engine planes.
  3. Usually their financial situation is difficult, with large debts to pay and a low salary.
  4. Getting to and from the airport, passing through security, attending the briefing, inspecting and preparing the aircraft, boarding passengers, deplaning passengers, packing up filing paperwork all form part of a pilot’s routine in addition to just flying the plane.
  5. More senior pilots want to fly international flights because they accumulate more flight hours per flight than domestic pilots and have more free days as a result.
  6. Emirates flew 46 planes to Dubai World Central Airport and left the planes there for months because they didn’t have enough pilots to fly them.
  7. Large American carriers have needed to fast-track younger pilots through the system earlier in order to keep their pilot numbers up.
  8. Regional airlines have needed to cancel routes as a result, even though they were likely profitable.
  9. The idea to increase automation to the point where only one or less pilots are needed has drawn a lot of criticism.
  10. The industry could help stop the decline in pilot numbers by making the cost of training much lower.

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Video answers: Why are jumbos disappearing?

Here are the answers to last Friday’s video, enjoy!

Suggested ICAO level for video: 5+

  1. It rectified the problem of increased intercontinental traffic.
  2. They wanted to be economical because they believed that the future of aviation would be supersonic jets and didn’t want to lose a lot of money on their investment.
  3. To make the plane more likely to be a success, they designed it to be both a passenger jet and a cargo jet.
  4. The first reason that jumbos are disappearing is that it’s expensive to operate and maintain four engines.
  5. The second reason that jumbos are disappearing is that aviation nowadays is becoming more of a point-to-point system instead of a hub-and-spoke one.
  6. It cost €25 billion euro and will never be recovered according to the video.
  7. They want more flights at different times of day instead of bigger aircraft with less frequency.
  8. It works for Emirates due to Dubai’s geographic location as a hub which connects different parts of the world.
  9. The 747 will slowly disappear as a passenger plane (but not as a freighter), while the A380 could survive if the industry returns to a hub-and-spoke system.

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Video answers: How airports make money

Here are the answers to last Friday’s video, enjoy!

Suggested ICAO level for video: 5+

  1. It’s privately owned so the government doesn’t own it.
  2. The break even point for per passenger revenue at Heathrow is $19 per passenger, or to put it another way, if Heathrow earns $19 per passenger that passes through the airport, they will be able to pay for their costs.
  3. Departing and connecting passengers are more valuable because they have more time to shop.
  4. Passengers spend most at retail stores, which earns Heathrow $5.15 per passenger.
  5. They spend more money because the airport encourages it by requiring passengers to pass through duty free shops before reaching their gates and also by not posting gate number until 45 minutes before a flight, which encourages passengers to stay in the central areas with shops. Finally, because Heathrow has many long-haul flights and a greater proportion of long-haul passengers are wealthier, they naturally spend more money.
  6. The average flight costs $9,500.
  7. On average it receives $29 per ticket.
  8. Because Heathrow needs bigger planes to make more money, it tries to encourage that, as a result it’s poorly connected to other domestic airports around the country.
  9. Most airports lose money because they’re government run and not very focused on making money.
  10. They do this because they see airport connections as having a positive economic benefit that they wouldn’t have without the discount for airlines.

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